quarterin

How to ride quarters in

Quarters in, what is it and how do we do it? Here are my best tips on how to ride quarters in for the beginner, intermediate and advanced rider.

In quarters in, the hindlegs of the horse are stepping inside of the track of a bent horse. It is also called travers and haunches in. While we are teaching the inside hindleg to step in under the point of weight in shoulder in, we teach the outside hindleg to step in under the point of weight in the quarters in.

In quarters in the front of the horse is on the track while the hindlegs of the horse are moving inside of the track.

Quarters in for the beginner

Just like for shoulder in, the horse must have a basic understanding of leg and rein aids. If the horse does not understand these aids, they are easier to teach from the ground. Here you can find some tips on how to do it.

For the rider the quarters in is often easier done on a straight line, whereas for the horse it is easier on circle, as the circle helps the horse with the bending. An easy start for the quarters in is to ride a circle in the corner and move out in a quarters in on the straight line.

The Swedish term of quarters in is directly translated into English as the word “close”. This is a good explanation to what quarters in is, because when you take the last step of a circle, or close the circle, you are in a quarters in. Basically, you ride a circle and just before you are about to end it, you continue forward on the straight line. This way you teach teach the outside hindleg to step in under the point of weight under the rider, and teach it to carry more weight.

In quarters in the outside hind leg is taught to step in under the point of weight.

When moving into quarters in you sit slightly more on the inside seat bone and move it forwards. Your outside leg ask the hindlegs to move in from the track. Your belly button is pointing in the direction between the ears of the horse. The inside rein is asking for stellning and stops the shoulders from falling in. The outside rein stops the shoulders from falling out. The reins aids should not be used to “hold” the shoulders or head in their position but only become active if the horse is falling in or out or loose the stellning.

Quarters in for the intermediate rider

When you and your horse have a basic understanding of the quarters in you want to focus on improving the quality of the exercise. Don’t do more sideways than you can maintain stellning and bending. If you lose it, the horse will straighten up and you will get something more like leg yield.

You want the horse to bend around your inside seat bone. When lowering the inside seat bone you rotate the chest of the horse. A good mental picture of chest rotation is to sit on a overthrown barrel. You can rotate the barrel by lowering your seat bones.

You can train your awareness of your seat bones by sitting on an overthrown barrel. If you sink down on your left seat bone, you lower the barrel (horse) to left and if you sink down on your right seat bone you lower the barrel (horse) to the right.

When the inside hip is moving forward down, your inside seat bone lowers and the chest of the horse rotates. The chest will be lower on the inside and get a bit higher on the outside. This is an essential part of proper bending of the horse, and cannot be obtained if you were to sit on the outside of the horse. Then the outside seat bone would press down the outside of the chest and you will get a counter rotation of the spine which is unhealthy for the horse (and rider).

Can you change between forward and collection just using your statical seat direction?

Your statical seat, or your upper body balance, should be slightly pointing toward the inside shoulder when going forward, and when collecting you move your upper body slightly towards the inside hind leg.

Quarters in for the advanced rider

The advanced rider want to ride more and more with the seat. The front muscles of the thighs move the shoulders of the horse and the back of the thighs move the hindlegs of the horse. However the back of the thighs cannot influence the hindlegs unless they are stepping in under the seat of the rider, i.e. go forward. The inside upper leg is always working in a downwards sense and the outside one in an upwards sense, to be able to maintain the chest rotation of the horse.

A rider in a right quarters in seen from behind. The back of the left upper leg moves the hindleg in and the front of the right upper leg moves the shoulder out.

For the quarters in, you use the back of the outer upper leg (heel in) to move the quarters in and the front of the inner upper leg (heel out) to move the shoulders out. Your feet should stay parallel to each other. You want to start investigating how little you can do and still get a quarters in. Is it possible to just use your seat (seat bones) to obtain a quarters? Can you change between forward and collection just using your statical seat direction? Congratulations – just sit and enjoy!

 

quarterin

How to ride shoulder in

Shoulder in, what is it and how do we do it? Here are my best tips on how to ride a shoulder in, for the beginner, intermediate and advanced rider.

…minimalism is a privilege of the master.

Easily expressed, shoulder in, or versade, is when a bent horse is moving its shoulders inside of the track. To this very simple explanation we can add a zillion little details, as we by time are getting more experience. Or maybe it is actually better to say that we are removing a zillion little details when we gain experience. When we know what we are doing we can also try to do less and less and still get a response from the horse. But as Bent always says, minimalism is a privilege of the master. First you need to be coarse and “too much” to learn the difference, to know when you are riding a shoulder in and when not. For a beginner rider a shoulder in on a straight line is often easier, as you can easily see when the shoulder has moved inside of the track but for the horse a shoulder in on a circle is often easier as the circle helps the horse with bending.

Shoulder in for the beginner

To be able to ride a shoulder in the horse must have a basic understanding of leg and rein aids. If the horse does not yet understand these aids, they are easier to teach from the ground.  Here, in my free AAoR online school, you can find some tips on how to do this.

You can begin the shoulder in on a straight line, but as mentioned above you need a horse that is bent for the shoulder in. If the horse is straightening up you will get something more like leg yield, but do not bother to much about this in the beginning. First you need to understand how to organize your body, and then you can think about organizing the body of the horse. To help with bending, ride a circle in the corner and when leaving the corner you go into a shoulder in on the straight line. The Swedish term of shoulder in is directly translated into English as the word “open”. This is a very good explanation to what shoulder in is, because when you take the first step of a circle, or open the circle, you are in a shoulder in. Basically you can think of a shoulder in as starting a circle, changing your mind  and not going into the circle but continuing on a straight line. We are teaching the inside hind leg to step toward the point of weight, under your seat.

When moving into shoulder in you sit slightly more on the inside seat bone and turn your torso so that your belly button is pointing towards the inner ear of the horse. The outside rein move the shoulders in and the inside rein give half-halts to maintain stellning. The inside leg will ask the inside hind leg to continue moving forward. In the beginning just do one or a few steps and then end the exercise. As the horse starts to understand you may increase the number of steps.

Shoulder in for the intermediate rider

As you get more used to the exercise you want to start improving the quality of your shoulder in.  Side movements like shoulder in is used a lot in the academic art of riding. It is also quite misunderstood, in the sense that people often focus on the “side” of the side movements. They should not be more sidewards than forwards. When you focus too much on the sidewards the horse often straighten up and fall on a shoulder or step too much out or in with a hindleg. Better is to focus on the bending and not do more sidewards than the horse can maintain its bending.

In the shoulder in you want the inside hip to move forward and down, when the inside hind leg is stepping forward toward the point of weight. This will rotate the chest and lift the outside shoulder. You must be careful not to sit on the outside of the horse, as this will press down the outside of the chest, with subsequent loss of stellning and bending. It is time to focus a bit more on your seat bones. You want to lower your inside seat bone and lift the outside seat bone. The seat bones are pointing to where you want the hind legs to step. The direction of the movement in shoulder in is going through the outside shoulder, so you want to move your inside seatbone slightly closer to the spine. Your statical seat, or your upper body balance, is slightly pointing toward the outside shoulder when going forward, and when collecting you move your upper body slightly towards the tail.

I cannot emphasize the word “slightly” enough here. If you do too much you will loose the bending and the horse will fall on the shoulders and loose the stepping of the hind legs towards the point of weight, under the seat of the rider.

With proper bending and stellning the horse will give to the inside rein and bend into the outside rein, making the use of the inside rein less and less important. However, it can of course still remind the horse to give, if needed. As before, the outside rein is moving the shoulders in.

Shoulder in for the advanced rider

Your riding is now more and more focused on sending all four legs of the horse in the direction of the movement, the hindlegs stepping in under the seat of the rider and the front legs stepping in under the muzzle of the horse. This can most easily be seen when looking at the hooves of the horse. Are they all moving in the same direction or is the direction of some hoof twisted in or out?

Do the front legs step in under the muzzle and the hind legs step in under your seat? If not, can you ask the legs to move in this direction?

You want to ride more and more with your seat. The upper legs of the rider should lie flat against the saddle. The front muscles of the thighs move the shoulders of the horse and the back of the thighs move the hindlegs of the horse. To do a shoulder in you use the front of the outer upper leg (heel out) to move the shoulder in and the back of the inner upper leg (heel in) to move the hindlegs out. Think that you are having skis on your feet. The skis, or your feet, should always stay parallel to each other. The inside upper leg is always working in a downwards sense and the outside one in an upwards sense, to maintain the rotation of the chest.

You need to be very aware of your direction of movement and balance. The inner seat bot is slightly down and closer to the spine and when riding forward shoulder in the direction of movement is to the outer shoulder whereas the collected shoulder in has the direction towards the tail. You will now get moments when you just sit in the direction you want to go and do not need any other aids. Enjoy and try to get more and longer such moments. However, do not forget that when you need to use and aid, do it. Do not just think that you are only riding with your seat now and will not use any other aids, because then you will eventually loose what you have gained. Always add the aids you need and then relax and see if you can sit and enjoy the ride. Continue developing your feeling of the horse moving under you. Can you feel how the four different legs are moving? Do the front legs step in under the muzzle and the hind legs step in under your seat? If not, can you ask the legs to move in this direction?

Continue developing your feeling of the horse moving under you.

 

quarterin

Bålstabil ridning – Placera dina sittben och svans

Sorry, this entry is only available in Swedish. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language.

Var placerar du dina sittben när du rider? Är det något som du tänker på eller är det kanske så att hästen placerar dem där den vill ha dem?

Sittbenen vill vi placera så att hästen böjer sig runt det inre sittbenet och omsluter, “kramar”,  ditt inre ben med sin bål. Det inre sittbenet ska placeras på sidan av ryggraden men var, lite närmare eller lite längre ifrån ryggraden, framåt eller bakåt, beror på den individuella hästen. Det yttre sittbenet ska vi lyfta upp så att vi inte trycker ner hästens utsida. Vi vill sitta på båda sittbenen, men det gör vi först när hästen roterar sin bröstkorg och därmed lyfter upp sin ytter sida till ditt sittben. Om vi “söker” hästens utsida genom att trycka ner vårt yttre sittben hindrar vi bröstkorgens rotation och hästens eget lyft av utsidan. Det förhindrar böjning och ställning och hästens förmåga att kliva fram ordentligt med bakbenen. Höjningen av ytter sittben skapar en liten “knyck” i din egen yttersida, se bilden, du drar alltså ihop den och blir skålad i utsidan och lång och rak på insidan.

Den vänstra bilden visar en rak ryttare och den högra bilden visar hur ytter sittben har dragits upp (vänster). Utsidan blir då skålad och insidan rak och lång.

Sittbenen ska peka rakt nedåt. Sitter man och lutar sig framåt pekar de lite bakåt och om man sitter och lutar sig lite bakåt pekar de framåt. Har du inte gjort det tidigare så sätt dig i boxen, som jag skrev om i tidigare inlägg. Tänk dig att du har en stor svans som hänger ner från din svanskota. Min svans är en stor luddig vargsvans. Hur ser din svans ut? Hur hänger den? Rakt ner, eller har du kanske dragit in svansen mellan benen eller gör du som arabhästarna ofta gör och drar svansen rakt upp i vädret? Tänk dig att det hänger en stor tyngd i din svans som drar den rakt neråt. Experimentera lite i sadeln när hästen står stilla genom att luta dig framåt, luta dig bakåt, framåt, bakåt osv. med fokus på dina sittben. Först lite större rörelser, och därefter mindre och mindre tills du har hittat din mitt. Där vill du sitta och där hänger din svans rakt ner! Kan du sitta kvar med sittben och svans rakt neråt när hästen börjar röra sig?